Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

97 results

Article

From Italy, a New Approach to Education: Reggio Emilia Model Getting Deserved Attention

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 5, no. 4

Pages: 9

Public Montessori

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

Minutes of the General Meeting of the A.M.I. Held in Bergamo, Italy, on August 5th, 1961

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1961, no. 3/4

Pages: 12–16

Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) - History, Conferences, Europe, Italy, Southern Europe

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

News Items [Austria, Ceylon, England, France, Germany, Holland, India, Ireland, Italy, Sweden, U.S.A.]

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1960, no. 1

Pages: 21–25

Americas, Asia, Austria, Ceylon, England, Europe, France, Germany, Great Britain, Holland, India, Ireland

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Education About Colour: A Look at Some Authors From the 19th and 20th Centuries in Italy: Corrado Ricci, Maria Montessori and Giuseppina Pizzigoni

Available from: Gruppo del Colore – Associazione Italiana Colore

Publication: Cultura e Scienza del Colore [Color Culture and Science], vol. 11, no. 2

Pages: 43-48

Europe, Italy, Southern Europe

See More

Abstract/Notes: In this contribution, the aim is to juxtapose three figures who, in spite of their very different skills, were interested in the element of colour. The first is Corrado Ricci, an illustrious art critic and historian, who started to study children’s drawings at the end of the 1800s, making him one of the first in Italy to do so. In 1877, he published a small pamphlet called L'arte dei bambini (The art of children), which included a special reflection about the theme of colour. Conversely, the other two authors are pedagogists: Maria Montessori (1870–1952), an internationally renowned figure who also dealt with the theme of colour through her method, equipment and tools, and Giuseppina Pizzigoni (1870–1947), a pedagogist who dedicated positivist attention to the theme of colour, which she linked to natural aspects and a connection to the vegetable garden, a cornerstone of her method. At the end of this historical overview, a survey that was conducted by the Istituto Comprensivo Rinnovata Pizzigoni is presented, in an attempt to observe the colour-related proposals that have been made.

Language: English

DOI: 10.23738/CCSJ.110205

ISSN: 2384-9568

Article

News Items [Argentina, Brazil, Ceylon, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Holland, India, Ireland, Italy, Liberia, Switzerland, U.S.A., Vietnam]

Publication: Communications (Association Montessori Internationale, 195?-2008), vol. 1960, no. 2

Pages: 23–27

Africa, Americas, Argentina, Asia, Brazil, Ceylon, Denmark, Europe, France, Germany, Great Britain, Holland

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0519-0959

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Autonomy, Spontaneity and Creativity in Research with Children. a Study of Experience and Participation, in Central Italy and North West England

Available from: Taylor and Francis Online

Publication: International Journal of Social Research Methodology, vol. 23, no. 1

Pages: 55-74

Autonomy in children, Creative ability in children, Creative thinking in children, England, Europe, Great Britain, Italy, Montessori method of education, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Spontaneity (Personality trait), United Kingdom

See More

Abstract/Notes: Research involving children, deemed to have difficulties with conventional means of communication, can perpetuate reductive forms of representation of children’s knowledges and experiences. This article focuses on the possibilities and opportunities that visual and creative methods can offer to researching with children. Children advance their views in and through spontaneous and concrete forms of participation. Autonomy in aesthetic acts is central to this methodology; to explore practices that produce and reproduce presuppositions deriving from societal attitudes affecting research with children, their agency and self-presentation. This cross-cultural study was conducted in Central Italy and North West England: children contributed their perspectives and experiences through participation in a series of creative encounters resulting in aesthetic and embodied outcomes of sociological and educational significance. The study contributes to the debate on children’s autonomy and the value and quality of participation through artistic practice. Examples from the corpus of data, which includes a series of artefacts and over 900 photographs from each geo-cultural context, are presented. The study shows that it is possible to harmonise power imbalances in spaces of creative freedom, in research and education, where children’s choices and agency are respected.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1080/13645579.2019.1672280

ISSN: 1364-5579

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Fairy Tales, Children’s Books and Schools in Sweden and Italy in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries: Historical Comparisons and Pedagogical Remarks

Available from: Università di Bologna

Publication: Ricerche di Pedagogia e Didattica / Journal of Theories and Research in Education, vol. 9, no. 2

Pages: 39-56

Europe, Italy, Montessori method of education, Northern Europe, Scandinavia, Southern Europe, Sweden

See More

Abstract/Notes: This paper examines some historical parallels in the field of children’s literature and education between Sweden and Italy in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Sweden and Italy are at the opposite ends of Europe, but they exhibited some interesting similarities in children’s book and pedagogy during those decades. Suffice it to say that two of the most important European education experts of the time – the Swede Ellen Key and the Italian Maria Montessori – were in relationship, appreciated each other’s work and exchanged ideas and remarks on educational and social issues. Parallels cannot obscure the large differences between the two nations, but there were also convergences that must be examined: researches on folktales, mass education and education of the élite were important issues in both countries. Moreover the convergences will intensify further in the coming decades, because Sweden and Italy belong to the same European context.

Language: English

DOI: 10.6092/issn.1970-2221/4362

ISSN: 1970-2221

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Pädagogische Kulturtransfers Italien-Tessin (1894-1936) [Cultural Transfers Between Educational Systems: Italy-Ticino (1894-1936) / Transfer culturali tra sistemi educativi: Italia-Ticino (1894-1936) / Transferts culturels entre systèmes éducatifs: Italie-Tessin (1894-1936)]

Available from: Universität Bern

Publication: Schweizerische Zeitschrift fuer Bildungswissenschaften / Swiss Journal of Educational Research, vol. 40, no. 1

Pages: 49-66

Europe, Italy, Montessori method of education - History, Switzerland, Western Europe

See More

Abstract/Notes: In the period 1880-1940 the education system of italian-speaking Canton Ticino was seeing pedagogical transfers coming from Italy. In a first period, the peagogical élite although deied that these pedagocal ideas came from Italy, using the terminological (and ideological) construction of “Metodo intuitivo” (i.e. Pestalozzi and Girard as the only fathers of the method). After 1910 the pedagogical influence of italian New Education (Montessori, Lombardo-Radice) grew more because the general interest in Ticino for italian culture grew with the movement for Defence of Ticino’s italian identity. World war 1 and fascism brought the New Education fellows in Ticino into a deep dilemma: their pedagogical ideas and actions were accepted only if accompanied by a total distance from any official italian political position. This was very difficult and led at the end to a growing total distance from Italy, even if the pedagogical élite tried to avoid the complete end of any cultural contact with Italy. The end cames with Abyssinia war and World war II that led to a total isolation of Ticino from Italy.

Language: German

DOI: 10.24452/sjer.40.1.5052

ISSN: 2624-8492

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Between New Education and Idealistic Vision: Giuseppe Lombardo Radice and the Arduous Path of L’educazione Nazionale in Italy (1927-1933)

Available from: Universität Bern

Publication: Schweizerische Zeitschrift fuer Bildungswissenschaften / Swiss Journal of Educational Research, vol. 41, no. 2

Pages: 354-368

Europe, Italy, New Education Fellowship, Southern Europe

See More

Abstract/Notes: Opening the issue of Pour l’ère nouvelle (January 1927), Adolphe Ferrière announced that L’Educazione Nazionale, directed by Giuseppe Lombardo Radice, would be the Italian partnership of the educational press officially committed with the New Education Fellowship. The strong relation between the two scholars was based on a shared vision of education as really focused on the release of children’s natural energies. The cultural mission of the Italian journal was not an easy one to accomplish, due to the increasingly heavy atmosphere characterizing the Italian public life, signed by the turning of Fascism into an authoritarian Regime. Up to the turning point of the thirties the review often tried to draw attention onto several themes and figures related to the progressive expansion of the New Education. Unfortunately, the involution of Fascism hindered the journal’s activity, finally forcing its closure in 1933.

Language: English

DOI: 10.24452/sjer.41.2.6

ISSN: 2624-8492

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Proving the Worth of the Montessori Method: An Account of Actual Experience with the System in Italy and America

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: The Volta Review, vol. 15, no. 1

Pages: 38-42

See More

Language: English

ISSN: 0042-8639

Advanced Search