Quick Search
For faster results please use our Quick Search engine.

Advanced Search

Search across titles, abstracts, authors, and keywords.
Advanced Search Guide.

1111 results

Doctoral Dissertation

Everyday Spirituality: Supporting the Spiritual Experience of Young Children in Three Early Childhood Educational Settings

Available from: Massey University - Theses and Dissertations

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Child development, Comparative education, Montessori schools, New Zealand, Oceania, Spirituality, Waldorf schools

See More

Abstract/Notes: The focus of this research is the spiritual experience of young children in early childhood educational settings. Spirituality is included in the New Zealand early childhood curriculum, Te Whariki, but is a relatively unarticulated aspect of educational practice. In order to find out how spirituality is supported in early childhood educational contexts this qualitative case study research took place in three early childhood settings: a Montessori casa, a private preschool and a Steiner (Waldorf) kindergarten. The methods used in the research included participant observation, interviews and focus groups. The teachers were asked to make a video about spirituality to reflect their own context and photographs were taken in each setting. The metaphor of spiritual landscape is used in this research. In this landscape everyday experience merged with the spiritual to form the concept of everyday spirituality. The cultural theories of everyday life supported a realisation that ordinary daily activity can become wonderful and mysterious when the spiritual dimension is realised. The themes that emerged from analysis of the case studies are conceptualised as transformative aspects of learning and relationships. They are aspects of everyday spirituality identified as spiritual withness; spiritual inbetweenness; and the spiritually elsewhere. Representing spiritual experience is challenging. The thesis is written in narrative form and contains core narratives as prose and poems. Using writing as a means of discovery made communicating spirituality through the medium of words a possibility. Spirituality is proposed to be an inclusive concept that affirms a sense of connection and this thesis found that all pedagogical practices in early childhood settings have the potential to include a spiritual aspect. In Aotearoa New Zealand many children lead their everyday lives in the context of an early childhood environment that includes teachers and parents as part of that community. This thesis argues that when everyday spirituality permeates early childhood contexts that all aspects of the curriculum are realised and the spiritual experience of everyone connected to that setting is supported.

Language: English

Published: Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2007

Article

Early Childhood Education in India: History, Trends, Issues, and Achievements

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: Early Childhood Education Journal, vol. 24, no. 1

Pages: 11-16

India, South

See More

Abstract/Notes: The changes in the social and economic structure of India have intensified the need for universal early childhood education. The formidable challenges before the Indian Government are: to provide high quality early childhood education programs; to preserve indigenous practices such as multilinguality, family/community involvement, participation of older children as caretakers of their younger siblings; and to provide early childhood education to all children despite serious financial constraints. This article presents a brief overview of the traditional childrearing practices in India, chronicles government initiatives in early childhood education, describes the range of programs available in India, and identifies goals that will shape the future of early childhood programs in India.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF02430544

ISSN: 1082-3301, 1573-1707

Thesis

Autism in Early Childhood Education Montessori Environments: Parents' and Teachers' Perspectives

Available from: Auckland University of Technology - Institutional Repository

Australasia, Australia and New Zealand, Autism, Special education, Children with disabilities, Montessori method of education, New Zealand, Oceania, Parent and child, Parent-teacher relationships, Special education, Teacher-student relationships

See More

Abstract/Notes: There is very little research about children with Autism in Montessori early childhood education in Aotearoa New Zealand. This study examined parents’ and teachers’ perspectives of children with Autism attending Montessori early childhood education environments. This thesis documents literature that explores and critiques Montessori philosophy and the teaching of children on the Autism spectrum. The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the Montessori teaching approach in early childhood education, as a supportive environment for children with Autism in the early years. However, I discovered that the Montessori environment is less than ideal if the teachers do not understand Autism Spectrum Disorder and do not make allowances for the symptoms that present themselves. It was my intention to explore the factors that complemented both Montessori and the support of children with Autism with an approach that is conducive to learning and encourages positive behavioural patterns. The findings revealed three main indicators being identified as important. These were social competence, language and communication, and individual interests and sensory implications. However, not all findings were positive. The parents all agreed that the teachers needed to be flexible and understanding in their approach, and many Montessori teachers are strict in their routine and are not prepared to sway from their teaching method to assist a child with Autism. This study suggests that Montessori early childhood teachers would benefit from professional development in the areas of including children with special needs, particularly Autism Spectrum Disorder, particularly in regards to understanding the unique characteristics of children with Autism and how they can effectively use the Montessori philosophy, equipment and prepared environment to support each child’s learning and development. Suggestions for future professional learning for Montessori teachers include the provision of professional development in including children with “special needs”, particularly Autism Spectrum Disorder for Montessori early childhood teachers. It is not only the Montessori philosophy and the prepared environment that supports the child with Autism, but the teacher’s awareness of the child’s needs and a willingness to be flexible in their approach.

Language: English

Published: Auckland, New Zealand, 2015

Article

Perspectives in Early Childhood Education: Belize, Brazil, Mexico, El Salvador and Peru

Available from: ERIC

Publication: Forum on Public Policy, vol. 2012, no. 1

Pages: 1-27

Americas, Belize, Brazil, Central America, Early childhood care and education, Early childhood education, El Salvador, Latin America and the Caribbean, Mexico, Peru, South America, ⛔ No DOI found

See More

Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education (ECE) provision is becoming a growing priority. During the past twenty years, Latin America has shown a growing recognition in the provision of educational programs for young children, birth to age eight, is essential. Urban and rural populations intimated in 2009, that many countries utilizing equitable access to quality early childhood programs is often seen by policy makers as a means of achieving economic and political goals (United Nations, 2012). Unfortunately, a pre-occupation with economic and political goals may conflict with the provision of quality programming for young children. In a number of Latin American countries provisions for educating young children exist as intent to provide quality services. The continuing challenge is to finance, organize and regulate those well-meaning intentions. The objective of this article is two-fold. First, to describe national policy efforts that regulate the education of young children consistently. And, second, to reflect the status of early childhood education programming; and to examine the possibilities for the improvement of the quality and accessibility of an education for all young children. Five Latin American nations have been chosen for examination, including: Belize, Brazil, El Salvador, Mexico, and Peru. (Contains 4 tables.)

Language: English

ISSN: 1556-763X, 1938-9809

Conference Paper

Emerging Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Education

Available from: ERIC

Meeting of the Elementary Education Division of the Virginia State Department of Education

See More

Abstract/Notes: Ten selected emerging trends in the field of early childhood education are discussed in this conference address: (1) a reevaluation of the view that early childhood education is a panacea; (2) greater emphasis on planned continuity between kindergartens and the primary grades; (3) increased use of multi-age grouping; (4) need for parenthood education in the high school; (5) importance of parent involvement in the decision making and policy formation processes concerning the education of his child and the implementation of classroom programs; (6) wider acceptance of the structured or prepared environment in programs; (7) development of a quality day care environment based on careful research and evaluation, (8) importance of humanistic or affective education; (9) need for aesthetic education (music, dance, literature, dramatics) in the total education of the child; and (10) accountability of teachers to the consumer as well as to the school boards. (Paper presented at a meeting of the Virginia State Department of Education, Elementary Education Division – Richmond, Virginia – October 1974)

Language: English

Published: Richmond, Virginia: Virginia State Department of Education, Oct 1974

Article

Status of Early Childhood Education in Nepal

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 28, no. 2

Pages: 57-61

Asia, Early childhood education, Nepal, South Asia

See More

Abstract/Notes: "...Primary education starts at the age ofsix in Nepal. Parents were not aware of the need of institutional education for their preschool children before the establishment of a Montessori School by the government for the first time in 1949. This school was based on the philosophy of the early childhood educationalist Madam Montessori. Since then the idea of early childhood education started to grow in the context ofNepal. With the establishment of a College of Education (Now Faculty of Education) in 1956, the Montessori School was merged into its Laboratory School. Thus, this Montessori School lost its separate identity and started to work as a downward extension of the Laboratory School of the college. Since then, this model as a downward extension of primary school was followed by the private and boarding schools..."

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF03174504

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Book Section

Montessori Philosophy in Early Childhood Education

Book Title: Early Childhood Education in Nigeria: Proceedings of the International Seminar on Early Childhood Education, Zaria, 4-8 July, 1983

Pages: 31-52

Africa, Early childhood education, Maria Montessori - Philosophy, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Nigeria, Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa

See More

Abstract/Notes: In this paper a brief biographical introduction to Dr. Maria Montessori provides insight into the origin of her philosophy of early childhood education. Key concepts underlying the Montessori approach to education are then developed with special emphasis on their interrelationship. More details are included in the group discussion report which is included at the end of the section.

Language: English

Published: Zaria, Nigeria: Institute of Education, Ahmadu Bello University, 1983

Article

Montessori Education and a Neighborhood School: A Case Study of Two Early Childhood Education Classrooms

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 1-18

Americas, Comparative education, Montessori method of education - Evaluation, North America, United States of America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Project SYNC (Systems, Yoked through Nuanced Collaboration) details perspectives of a community of stakeholders committed to the enhancement of early childhood (i.e., prekindergarten through grade 3) education. Although there is a growing number of public-school programs informed by the Montessori philosophy, Montessori educational experiences often take place within affluent communities. SYNC aimed to enhance the prekindergarten through grade 3 educational experiences for traditionally underserved students by transforming two traditional early childhood classrooms to Montessori settings within a diverse, Title I school. Montessori pedagogy, curricula, and materials aligned with the school’s dedicated commitment to social justice. The study, one in a series, explored the impact of Montessori education on a neighborhood school community as evidenced through stakeholder opinions, project implementation, and teacher attitudes. Project data illustrate that a Montessori educational experience created learning opportunities that supported children from culturally and ethnically diverse communities in a traditional, Title I elementary school.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v6i1.8539

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

Beyond Developmentalism? Early Childhood Teachers' Understandings of Multiage Grouping in Early Childhood Education and Care

Available from: SAGE Journals

Publication: Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 34, no. 4

Pages: 55-63

See More

Abstract/Notes: Postdevelopmental perspectives in early childhood education and care increasingly reference alternative ways of understanding learning, growth and development in early learning. Drawing on these ideas, this paper examines research findings which focused on early childhood teachers' understandings of multiage grouping. The findings suggested that teachers used predominantly developmental approaches to describing their experiences of multiage grouping, and proposed that the use of postdevelopmental perspectives in multiage grouping research has the potential to realise new ways of understanding learning and development as both concepts and practices within the multiage classroom.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1177/183693910903400408

ISSN: 1836-9391, 1839-5961

Article

The European Roots of Early Childhood Education in North America

Available from: Springer Link

Publication: International Journal of Early Childhood, vol. 18, no. 1

Pages: 6-21

Americas, Canada, Kindergarten (Froebel system of education) - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., North America

See More

Abstract/Notes: Early childhood education in North America is currently in a state of flux. While Piagetian approaches to early childhood education curricula seem to predominate in North America today, some of the influences of the other paradigms discussed below are still in evidence. The idea of nurturing children as well as educating them has endured, even with the new cognitive focus. The concept of curricula appropriate to a child’s developmental level, first introduced by Froebel, has remained an important idea. The Montessori method has enjoyed a renaissance in North America, and specially designed curricula for the disabled has been re-established as the norm, after Itard’s and Seguin’s pioneering examples. Yet, new issues in early childhood education have arisen in North America. There is a great debate on the effects of day care, the changing family, the possibility of “hurried children”, and the role of state support in a “universal” child care system. The recent Report of the task force on child care in Canada reviewed many of these issues, and used data on child care arrangements in a number of European countries compared to canada and the United States in much of its discussion. It is not surprising, given the history of models of child care which have come from Europe to North America, that North Americans are once again looking across the Atlantic for fresh ideas.

Language: English

DOI: 10.1007/BF03176578

ISSN: 0020-7187, 1878-4658

Advanced Search