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983 results

Article

Kinder lernen auch von Kindern: zur Jahrgangsmischung an Montessori-Schulen [Children also learn from children: for a mixed-age group in Montessori schools]

Publication: Montessori: Zeitschrift für Montessori-Pädagogik, vol. 37, no. 1

Pages: 20-27

Montessori method of education, Nongraded schools

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Language: German

ISSN: 0944-2537

Article

Montessori Headlines [Little Flower Montessori Schools, New York; Dutch Princess Maria Christina, teacher at Caedmon's Montessori School, New York]

Publication: AMS News, vol. 6, no. 1

Pages: 3

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Language: English

ISSN: 0065-9444

Article

Montessori Schools and Nursery Schools

Available from: The Times Educational Supplement Historical Archive - Gale

Publication: The Times Educational Supplement (London, England)

Pages: 353

, Spain

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Language: English

ISSN: 0040-7887

Article

Instant Montessori Schools: According to David Lerch, Who Should Know, Federal Magnet Grants Will Be Announced in August - and Schools Will Open in September

Available from: University of Connecticut Libraries - American Montessori Society Records

Publication: Public School Montessorian, vol. 7, no. 2

Pages: 1

Public Montessori

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Language: English

ISSN: 1071-6246

Article

IMS Montessori Schools [Profiles of 4 Schools]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 3, no. 4

Pages: 1, 3

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

IMS Montessori Schools [Profiles of 6 Schools]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 3, no. 2

Pages: 1, 3

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

Montessori Schools Join IMS [Profiles of 11 schools]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 2, no. 8

Pages: 1, 3

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

Seeking Racial and Ethnic Parity in Preschool Outcomes: An Exploratory Study of Public Montessori Schools vs. Business-as-Usual Schools

Available from: University of Kansas Libraries

Publication: Journal of Montessori Research, vol. 9, no. 1

Pages: 16-36

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Abstract/Notes: Montessori pedagogy is a century-old, whole-school system increasingly used in the public sector. In the United States, public Montessori schools are typically Title I schools that mostly serve children of color. The present secondary, exploratory data analysis examined outcomes of 134 children who entered a lottery for admission to public Montessori schools in the northeastern United States at age 3; half were admitted and enrolled and the rest enrolled at other preschool programs. About half of the children were identified as White, and half were identified as African American, Hispanic, or multiracial. Children were tested in the fall when they enrolled and again in the subsequent three springs (i.e., through the kindergarten year) on a range of measures addressing academic outcomes, executive function, and social cognition. Although the Black, Hispanic, and multiracial group tended to score lower in the beginning of preschool in both conditions, by the end of preschool, the scores of Black, Hispanic, and multiracial students enrolled in Montessori schools were not different from the White children; by contrast, such students in the business-as-usual schools continued to perform less well than White children in academic achievement and social cognition. The study has important limitations that lead us to view these findings as exploratory, but taken together with other findings, the results suggest that Montessori education may create an environment that is more conducive to racial and ethnic parity than other school environments.

Language: English

DOI: 10.17161/jomr.v9i1.19540

ISSN: 2378-3923

Article

IMS Montessori Schools [Profiles of 7 Schools]

Publication: Montessori Observer, vol. 3, no. 3

Pages: 1, 3-4

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Language: English

ISSN: 0889-5643

Doctoral Dissertation

Skolans Levda Rum och Lärandets Villkor: Meningsskapande i Montessoriskolans Fysiska Miljö [The School's Living Space and the Conditions of Learning: Creating Meaning in the Montessori School's Physical Environment]

Architecture, Design, Environment, Europe, Nordic countries, Northern Europe, Scandinavia, Sweden

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Abstract/Notes: This study examines the school’s physical environment as a place of learning, and takes its starting point in the phenomenology movement, inspired both by Merleau-Ponty’s thesis of man’s physical relation to the world and by the existential analysis represented by Heidegger which implies a mutual relationship between man and the world. Such a view rejects a standpoint which describes man as being divided between a material body and a thinking soul. Instead, there emerges an embodied self which engages in meaningful interaction with its surroundings. The choice of this standpoint has implications for the design of the school’s physical environment. Montessori pedagogy is one of the activity-based pedagogies which have designed the physical environment in line with this theory. The purpose of the study is to understand, but further to visualise, the way in which the conditions for learning for children and adolescents are created in schools, from pre-school to lower secondary level, which follow the Montessori pedagogy. The material for the empirical study has been gathered from Europe and the US and from differing social contexts. The reason for this is to discover what distinguishes the prepared environment. The study also discusses the way in which the argument for a form of schooling which is based on activity, from the early 20th century to the present day, has been addressed through the architectural design of schools. The thesis shows that the rich array of didactic material in the schools observed offers pupils the opportunity to perform activities which create meaning. The organisation of the environment provides the pupils with the necessary conditions to concentrate fully on their work and to complete their tasks without interruption. I see the didactic continuity which prevails from pre-school to the lower secondary school in the Montessori schools studied as a prerequisite if the pedagogical activity is to offer meaning and create the conditions for learning in the way demonstrated by the empirical studies.

Language: Swedish

Published: Stockholm, Sweden, 2012

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