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Book Section

Théosophie et éducation en Espagne (1891-1939): espaces de sociabilité et réseaux éducatifs [Theosophy and education in Spain (1891-1939): spaces of sociability and educational networks]

Available from: OpenEdition Books

Book Title: Éduquer dans et hors l’école: Lieux et milieux de formation. XVIIe-XXe siècle

Pages: 87-102

Europe, Southern Europe, Spain, Theosophical Society, Theosophy

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Abstract/Notes: L’occasion de lancer des recherches sur les liens entre le mouvement théosophique et l’éducation en Espagne et l’intérêt que celles-ci pouvaient présenter surgirent à partir de la lecture du Petit Journal d’Adolphe Ferrière dans les Archives de l’institut J.-J. Rousseau de l’université de Genève. En 1930, de passage à Barcelone sur le chemin de son long voyage vers l’Amérique latine, le pédagogue suisse fut reçu par Maria Solà de Sellarés, Attilio Bruschetti et José Forteza. Cependant ces personnages n’apparaissent pas dans les pages de l’historiographie de l’éducation nouvelle et de la rénovation pédagogique en Catalogne au cours du premier tiers du XXe siècle. Après les recherches qui s’imposaient, nous sûmes qu’ils militèrent dans l’hétérodoxe mouvement théosophique et que, suivant les pas de Béatrice Ensor, ils se rapprochèrent de sa pédagogie par le biais de la Fraternité internationale de l’Éducation. La vocation éducative du mouvement théosophique se manifesta dans l’organisation de cours et de conférences, l’édition de livres et de dépliants à caractère doctrinal et didactique, la création d’espaces de sociabilité et, entre autres initiatives, par la fondation d’un certain nombre d’écoles et de centres éducatifs qui tentèrent de rejoindre les mouvements rénovateurs européens, tout en restant fidèles au spiritualisme oriental. Plus tard et malgré les distances que leur imposèrent dissidences et fractures, un autre courant allait apparaître à l’horizon de l’évolution de ce mouvement: l’anthroposophie de Steiner et la pédagogie Waldorf. Cet article se propose d’analyser, dans les contextes européen et international, la fonction sociale, éducative et socialisatrice de la théosophie et des réseaux socioéducatifs théosophiques, hors et dans l’école, en Espagne au cours du premier tiers du XXe siècle. Cette recherche part de l’analyse de sources orales (membres de familles de théosophes et personnes ayant des liens avec le mouvement théosophique) et de sources écrites (directes et indirectes) consultées et étudiées dans diverses archives : Biblioteca de Cataluña (Barcelone), bibliothèque privée de la Branche Arjuna de Barcelone, Centro nacional de la Memoria histórica de Salamanque (Espagne), archives privées de la famille Jover Dalmau (ancien élève de l’école Damon) et Archives historiques municipales de Sabadell (Catalogne). [The opportunity to launch research on the links between the theosophical movement and education in Spain and the interest that these could present arose from the reading of the Petit Journal d'Adolphe Ferrière in the Archives of the institute J.-J. Rousseau from the University of Geneva. In 1930, passing through Barcelona on the way to his long journey to Latin America, the Swiss teacher was received by Maria Solà de Sellarés, Attilio Bruschetti and José Forteza. However, these characters do not appear in the pages of the historiography of new education and educational renewal in Catalonia during the first third of the twentieth century. After the necessary research, we learned that they were active in the heterodox theosophical movement and that, following in the footsteps of Beatrice Ensor, they approached her pedagogy through the International Fraternity of Education. The educational vocation of the theosophical movement was manifested in the organization of courses and conferences, the publication of books and leaflets of a doctrinal and didactic nature, the creation of spaces for sociability and, among other initiatives, by the foundation of a number of schools and educational centers which tried to join the European renovating movements, while remaining faithful to Eastern spiritualism. Later and despite the distances imposed by dissidence and fractures, another current would appear on the horizon of the evolution of this movement: the anthroposophy of Steiner and the Waldorf pedagogy. This article aims to analyze, in European and international contexts, the social, educational and socializing function of theosophy and theosophical socio-educational networks, outside and in school, in Spain during the first third of the twentieth century. This research starts from the analysis of oral sources (members of families of Theosophists and people with links to the Theosophical movement) and written sources (direct and indirect) consulted and studied in various archives: Biblioteca de Cataluña (Barcelona), library private of the Arjuna Branch of Barcelona, ​​Centro nacional de la Memoria histórica de Salamanca (Spain), private archives of the Jover Dalmau family (former pupil of the Damon school) and Municipal Historical Archives of Sabadell (Catalonia).]

Language: French

Published: Rennes, France: Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2018

ISBN: 978-2-7535-5561-7

Series: Histoire

Article

The Learning Abilities of the Young Child: Arguments in Favour of Day-Care, Pre-School Education and Parent Education

Publication: Montessori Quarterly, vol. 25

Pages: 2–13

Muriel I. Dwyer - Writings

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Language: English

Doctoral Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Circular Food Education: Developing a food education programme based on sustainability, experiential learning and pleasure in Irish primary schools

Available from: Technological University Dublin

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Abstract/Notes: This research explored how an expanded and sustained education about food within the primary school curriculum in the Republic of Ireland could be achieved. A constructivist ontology underpinned the project, with multiple theoretical frameworks related to constructivist learning and building agency, informing the study. A multi-method action research methodology was used, providing practical solutions through action, reflection, practice and theory. A narrative review of the literature and existing policy preceded three sections of fieldwork. A scoping consultation with key stakeholders was followed by the development and piloting of a food education programme entitled the Global Citizenship Food and Biodiversity Theme in eight primary schools over two years, in conjunction with Green-Schools. The third section of fieldwork verified and expanded the results within a research findings feedback workshop which included academics working in education, principals, teachers, trainee teachers, and two staff members from the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment. The scoping consultation with key stakeholders highlighted a desire for a changed approach to food education in Irish primary schools. The key findings indicated that schools are in a unique position to influence and promote food education, but that an expanded approach to the current curriculum’s principal focus on health and nutrition was required. The term ‘circular food education’ was coined to describe the approach to food education which was consequently developed. Circular food education encompasses experiential learning, sustainability and pleasure. It is grounded in theory and is an educational solution to tackling an array of social issues: building knowledge about climate change, biodiversity loss, and food waste, teaching practical food skills, as well as instilling the potential for children to become active citizens. The development and piloting of the Global Citizenship Food and Biodiversity Theme illustrated how educational approaches that stem from constructivism could be put into practice. This theme included hands-on classes as well as building agency to think critically through the use of collaborative and social learning methods. Amartya Sen’s capability approach was used as a theoretical framework to evaluate data generated from the pilot. The research findings feedback workshop indicated that increased circular food education would require support from the whole-school, a change in approach by government as well as teacher training to address confidence and agency, and the provision of suitable facilities. One of the outputs from the research is the Global Citizenship Food and Biodiversity Theme programme which is being implemented incrementally in schools on a nation-wide basis, with 120 locations to date. A limitation of the Global Citizenship Food and Biodiversity Theme is the two-year cycle of the Green-Schools flag system. The thesis recommends a systemic policy change to food education in Irish primary schools. An embedded full-time approach within the primary curriculum would provide structure and scaffolding but requires a collaborative approach from all stakeholders. Until then, an increase in teacher training and developing teacher agency would be a suitable first step to increased food education in Irish primary school classrooms. Circular food education offers a model, which helps provide students with the ability to lead a life in which both they, and the natural world, could flourish.

Language: English

Published: Dublin, Ireland, 2023

Conference Paper

Education for Conflict – Education for Peace

Available from: ERIC

Annual Meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society

City Montessori School (Lucknow, India), Peace education, Public Montessori

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Abstract/Notes: This paper contrasts the use of education for conflict with the use of education for peace, shows some historical developments in the field of peace education, and summarizes facets and the diffusion of peace education. The paper explores some considerations for learning environments suitable for peace education programs and describes selected features of two schools to illustrate the implementation of some of the characteristics of peace education. It explains that, although college offerings in peace education worldwide demonstrate the scarcity of peace education programs in mainstream educational institutions, a Web site listing colleges and universities that offer peace studies programs shows approximately 120 graduate and undergraduate programs, most of which are located in North America. The paper notes that in public schools, peace education can at best be found in the international education or conflict resolution programs designed to prevent school violence. Appended is a reference list of peace education Web sites, selected by the U.S. Department of Education. (Contains 27 references.)

Language: English

Published: Orlando, Florida: Comparative and International Education Society, Mar 2002

Article

✓ Peer Reviewed

A Successful Experiment in Child Education [The Henry Barnard School, Rhode Island College of Education, Providence]

Available from: JSTOR

Publication: Elementary School Journal, vol. 30, no. 7

Pages: 539-546

Americas, Henry Barnard School (Rhode Island) - History, Montessori method of education - Criticism, interpretation, etc., Montessori method of education - History, North America, United States of America

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Language: English

DOI: 10.1086/456450

ISSN: 1554-8279, 0013-5984

Master's Thesis (M.A.)

“All Education but No Schooling”: Education Reform in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland

Available from: ProQuest - Dissertations and Theses

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Abstract/Notes: When critics consider utopian literature, they often claim that the utopian imagination is limited in its ability to provide practical instruction for societal reform. In Archaeologies of the Future, Fredric Jameson extends this critique by arguing that the utopian imagination only exists “to demonstrate and to dramatize our incapacity to imagine the future” (288-289). By returning to an early twentieth century utopian novel, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland (1915), we can put pressure on Jameson’s ideas about the ultimate function of the utopian imagination. By analyzing the education system in Herland, we are able to see how Gilman integrated the contemporary educational philosophy of John Dewey and methods of Maria Montessori to provide an intellectual and institutional foundation for her utopian education system. Therefore, Gilman provides a set of ‘instructions’ to suggest how we might reform current methods of education to fit within her utopian vision. Gilman’s Herland allows us to see how a highly imaginative utopian text can promote social change to build a ‘better’ future.

Language: English

Published: Carbondale, Illinois, 2016

Book Section

The New Education Fellowship: An International Forum for Progressive Education

Book Title: Progressive Education Across the Continents: A Handbook

Pages: 179-191

Educational change, New Education Fellowship, New Education Movement, Progressive education - Criticism, interpretation, etc.

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Language: English

Published: Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Peter Lang, 1995

ISBN: 978-3-631-48917-8 978-0-8204-2914-4 3-631-48917-X 0-8204-2914-7

Series: Heidelberger Studien zur Erziehungswissenschaft (Frankfurt am Main, Germany) , 44

Article

My System of Education [Address Before the National Education Association at Oakland, Cal.]

Available from: HathiTrust

Publication: Educator-Journal, vol. 16, no. 2

Pages: 63-71

Americas, Maria Montessori - Speeches, addresses, etc., Maria Montessori - Writings, National Education Association (NEA), North America, United States of America

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Language: English

Master's Thesis

A Study Comparing the Effect of Multiage Education Practices versus Traditional Education Practices on Academic Achievement

Available from: ERIC

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Abstract/Notes: This study compared the effects of multi-age classroom strategies to those of traditional classroom strategies on the academic achievement of fourth grade students in reading and math. Standardized test scores from 20 fourth-grade students in two multi-age third- and fourth-grade classrooms were compared to the scores of 20 students from 7 traditional fourth-grade classrooms. The Stanford Achievement Test (SAT), ninth edition was used as the test instrument. Scores from the students' third grade test in the 1996-97 school year were compared to their scores from the fourth grade test in reading and math by applying T-tests to the data. Analysis of the data revealed no difference in reading or math achievement between students taught in a multi-age classroom and those from a traditional classroom.

Language: English

Published: Salem, West Virginia, 1998

Doctoral Dissertation (Ed.D.)

Preschool STEM Education: Perspectives on the Education-Practice Gap and Professional Development

Available from: California State University - ScholarWorks

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Abstract/Notes: This research revolved around Johnson's (2013) definition of early childhood science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, emphasizing the integration of science and math instruction with scientific inquiry, engineering design, mathematical analysis, and 21st-century interdisciplinary skills. Johnson recommended using an approach called integrated STEM, which aims to create a meaningful integration of STEM disciplines in the context of real-world challenges and problems. Given the swift advancements in science and technology, early exposure to STEM concepts is crucial for children. Research has indicated introducing STEM in preschool equips children with foundational skills to explore complex concepts in elementary school. Early childhood experiences have a substantial impact on cognitive and academic development, fostering brain development and enhancing lifelong cognitive and academic outcomes. Young children naturally exhibit qualities like prediction, hypothesizing, analysis, and curiosity. They actively engage with their surroundings, constructing scientific and mathematical understanding through hands-on STEM activities, and developing competence, knowledge, and problem-solving skills. This study employed narrative inquiry and autoethnography to explore early childhood educators' needs, talents, and challenges in integrating STEM curricula. It addressed critical questions about STEM education, such as its ideal form, optimal introduction timing, and ensuring equitable access for all preschoolers. The research examined educators' STEM knowledge and identified implementation barriers that affect STEM self-efficacy. This research underscores the importance of introducing STEM education early in childhood and highlights the need for comprehensive policies and equitable funding. The study's results bridge the knowledge–doing gap and emphasized the significance of adequately preparing educators to provide STEM-related curricula.

Language: English

Published: San Francisco, California, 2023

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